Thursday, April 7, 2016

Kill the Boy Band

Kill the Boy BandAuthor: Goldy Moldavsky
Info: Point, copyright 2016, 32

Okay, so just know from the start that it wasn't supposed to go like this. All we wanted was to get near The Ruperts, our favorite boy band.

We didn't mean to kidnap one of the guys. It kind of, sort of happened that way. But now he's tied up in our hotel room. And the worst part of all, it's Rupert P. All four members of The Ruperts might have the same first name, but they couldn't be more different. And Rupert P. is the biggest flop out of the whole group.

We didn't mean to hold hostage a member of The Ruperts, I swear. At least, I didn't. We are fans. Okay, superfans who spend all of our free time tweeting about the boys and updating our fan tumblrs. But so what, that's what you do when you love a group so much it hurts.

How did it get this far? Who knows. I mean midterms are coming up. I really do not have time to go to hell.

~Goodreads Description

Hmmm...

Well...

Uh...

Hmmm...  This book.  I didn't quite "get" this book.

We have fangirls.  This particular group of fangirls are obsessed with a boy band called The Ruperts - aptly named because each of the members share the name Rupert.  The Ruperts are going to be hosting a Thanksgiving special in New York City, and our fangirls have decided to reserve a room in the same hotel with the hopes of running into them.  And they do.  Well, they run into one of them.  Literally.  Then there is a kidnapping.  And things get out of control very, very quickly.

The premise sounds fun.  Yes.  Once upon a time I enjoyed a good boy band.  I grew up in the era of New Kids On the Block and later The Backstreet Boys and N'Sync.  I maybe might have gone to their concerts, but I didn't own any t-shirts, or posters, or dolls.  I was not a fangirl, but I knew them.  They were a bit crazy, but were generally harmless young women who had vivid imaginations.

But this book was not depicting those girls.  Is it satire? A tongue and cheek commentary on fandom?  I can't tell.  I feel like it was meant to be funny, but I was more disgusted than amused.  I would have even preferred the characters to be stereotyped into the girls I knew.  At times Moldavsky tried, describing each of the girls and why they liked a particular boy, but in order for that to work it would have had to be exaggerated.  Instead, we have morally depraved young girls who take no responsibility for their actions.  There's also a bit of fat shaming which is uncomfortable and unresolved and an ending that left me unsatisfied.

The thing is, I liked the voice of the book.  Not the narrator, but the voice.  It was conversational and familiar.  The audiobook reader did an excellent job bringing that to life, not "reading" the book but telling the listener a story.  Moldavsky has talent, but this was just not the story for me.

It has stayed with me though.  I have talked to others about it.  Ranted about it.  Vented about it.  And I've gone back and read reviews to see if I was alone in my assessment.  In that, Moldavsky has succeeded.

I'd love to hear your thoughts.  Check it out from your library and let me know what you think.

Well shoot, now I have a Backstreet Boys song in my head.  "You are, my fire. The one, desire. Believe, when I say, I want it that way."

Happy reading!


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